The History of the Fluffernutter

There are few things in this world more delicious than a fluffernutter sandwich unless of course, you’re allergic to peanuts (in which case, our condolences).

But where did they come from?

The glorious honor of being the pioneer of marshmallow fluff goes to Emma Curtis of Melrose, Massachusets. It turns out she also happened to be Paul Revere’s great-great-great-granddaughter. Emma and her brother Amory  began making and marketing Snowflake Marshmallow Crème in 1913. The Curtises did not invent marshmallow fluff, and there were numerous companies who had similar products at the time. However, it was Emma’s ingenuity that led her to print tiny recipes on brochures she passed around and  to advertise on the radio as well. By 1915, Snowflake Marshmallow Crème was sold across the country.

It was during WWI that Emma published a recipe for what she called a “Liberty Sandwich”, which consisted of marshmallow fluff and peanut butter on an oat bread. This is thought to be the first instance of fluffernutter sandwich in print.When Emma Curtis died in 1948 at the age of 85, her younger brother Amory continued to run the company until 1962. Sadly that same year an arsonist burned down the Curtis Marshmallow Factory effective ending the business.

When Emma Curtis died in 1948 at the age of 85, her younger brother Amory continued to run the company until 1962. Sadly that same year an arsonist burned down the Curtis Marshmallow Factory effective ending the business.

Around this same time an entrepreneur named Archibald Query was busy making a marshmallow fluff of his own. However, sugar rations during WWI hurt his company’s sales and so in 1920 Query sold his recipe to two men from a company called Durkee-Mower Inc. for $500. It was originally marketed as Toot Sweet Marshmallow Fluff, and to this day is being sold as the traditional Marshmallow Fluff you find on store shelves.

The peanut butter and marshmallow fluff sandwiches were not officially called Fluffernutters until 1960 when an advertising firm hired by Durkee-Mower created the term as a marketing ploy. Fluffernutter is still a registered trademark of Durkee-Mower.

Just in case you’re as crazy about fluff as we are, you can visit Somerville, MA for their annual “What the Fluff?” festival.

 

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